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*c 



The EDITH and LORNE PIERCE 
COLLECTION o/CANADIANA 




Queens University at Kingston 



TZBSTIIK£03Sri.i^LS 



IN FAVOUR OF 



JOHN WADDELL 

Bachelor of Arts, Dalhousie College, Nova Scotia ; Bachelor of Science of the 
University of London ; Doctor of Philosophy of the University of 
Heidelberg ; Doctor of Science of the University of Edin- 
burgh ; Formerly Hope Prizeman and Vans Dunlop 
Scholar in the University of Edinburgh ; 
Late Professor of Science in the 
Royal Military College 
of Canada. 



KINGSTON, OflT. '. 
WILLIAM JACKSON, PRINTER. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Statement by the Candidate, ... . . . . 4 

List of Academic Honours and Appointments, . . 6 

List of Papers in Scientific Journals, . . . . . . 7 

Testimonials from — 

1. Robert Wtlhelm Bunsen, Professor of Chemistry in the University 

of Heidelberg, . . . . . . . . . . 8 

2. Alex. Crum Brown, M.D., D.Sc, F.R.S.L. & E., Professor of 

Chemistry in the University of Edinburgh, . . . . 9 

3. George Chrystal, M.A., Professor of Mathematics in the Univers- 

ity of Edinburgh, . . . . . . . . 10 

4. P. G. Tait, M.A., Sec. R. S. E., Hon. Fellow of St Peter's College, 

Cambridge, Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of 
Edinburgh, .. .. .. .. .. 10 

5. James Geikie, LL.D., F.R.S., &c, Murchison Professor of Geology 

and Mineralogy, University of Edinburgh, . . 11 

6. John Gibson, Ph.D., F.R,S.E., F.l.C, Senior Demonstrator in the 

Chemical Laboratory of the University of Edinburgh, . . 12 

7. Cargill G. Knott, D.Sc, (Edin.), F.R.S.E., Professor of Physics, 

Imperial University, Japan, formerly Assistant to the Chair of 
Natural Philosophy, Edinburgh University, . . . 13 

8. A. P. Aitken, M.A., D.Sc, F.R.S.E., Professor of Chemistry in 

the Royal Veterinary College ; Examiner in Chemistry in the Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh ; Chemist in the Highland and Agricultural 
Society of Scotland, . . . . . . . . 14 

9. Orme Masson, M.A., D.Sc, F.R.S.E., Late Elective Fellow in the 

University of Edinburgh ; Professor of Chemistry in the University 
of Melbourne, . . . . . . . . 15 

10. The Students in the Chemical Laboratory of the University of Edin- 

burgh, . . . . . . . . 16 

11. Gerald Kitson, Lt. -Colonel, Commandant of the Royal Military 

College, of Canada, . . . . . . . . . . 17 

12. Capt. J. B. Cochrane, Instructor of Science in the Royal Military 

College of Canada, . . . . . . . . . 17 

13. Adam Shortt, M.A., Professor of Political Science, Queen's Uni- 

versity, Kingston, Ont. , . . . . 18 

14. W. L. Goodwin, B.Sc, (London) D.Sc, (Edin.) F.R.S.C, Director 

of the School of Mining, Kingston, Ont., . . 19 



Ps>r~&^i^\ 



Statement by the Candidate. 
In applying for 



I beg to submit the following statement regarding my 
academic career and my qualifications for filling the 
post for which I offer myself as a candidate. 

After a preliminary education at Pictou Academy, 
I entered Dalhousie College in 1873, gaining one (of 
two) of the Professors' Scholarships entitling the win- 
ner, so long as he maintained a sufficiently high stand- 
ard in his examinations, to free attendance on the 
professors' lectures. This Scholarship I kept through- 
out my course, and besides several class prizes, I won, 
in my third year, the "Alumni Prize" and the 
" Waverley Prize", though owing to the regulation 
preventing them being held concurrently, I retained 
the latter only. In 1877 I graduated as B.A. with 
Honours in Mathematics, and the Governor-Generars 
Gold Medal. 

In 1880 I went to Edinburgh and studied there main- 
ly under Professor Crum Brown and Professor Tait. I 
also spent a few months in London, and in 1882 gain- 
ed the Degree of B.Sc. from that University. The 
succeeding year I gained the same degree in Edin- 
burgh, and on winning the Hope Prize in Chemistry 
(value one hundred pounds) I went to Germany and 
studied in Heidelberg under Kopp and Bunsen, work- 
ing in the laboratory of the latter, and in 1884 obtain- 
ed the degree of Ph.D. (insigni cum laude). 



On returning to Edinburgh I was appointed Assist- 
ant to the Professor of Chemistry, and in 1885 T won 
the Vans Dun lop Scholarship in Chemistry (worth one 
hundred pounds annually for three years.) 

In 1886 I took the degree of D.Sc. in Edinburgh, 
my thesis being on " The Atomic Weight of Tung- 
sten," an abstract of which was published in the 
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and 
in the American Chemical Journal. In the Autumn 
of 1886 I was appointed Professor of Science in the 
Royal Military College of Canada, which position I 
have held till the present. The shortening of the 
course from four years to three makes it impossible 
for the students who will in future come to the Mili- 
tary College to overtake the work which has formerly 
been taught in my department, and thus the necessity 
for my services has been done away with. 

As, however, my later testimonials show, I think 1 
can claim to have maintained that steady application 
to the work of my department which received during 
my University course the reward of University Hon- 
ours, and obtained for me the commendation of my 
professors, colleagues and students. 

Though devoting myself mainly to the instruction- 
al work of my department, which took up ten months 
of the year, and endeavouring to keep myself in touch 
with the advances on all sides of the subjects which I 
had to teach, I have published several original papers 
and articles of an educational nature in various Eng- 
lish and American Scientific Journals. 

Perhaps I ought to add that I am now thirty-eight 
years of age. 

JOHN WADDELL. 

189 Johnston Street, 
Kingston, Ont., July 1st, 1897. 



List of Academic Honours and Appointments. 



1877. .. .Graduated B.A., Dalhousie College, Nova 
Scotia. 
Honours in Mathematics and Governor-Gen- 
eral's Gold Medal. 

1882. . . .Graduated B.Sc, London. 

1883 Graduated B.Sc, Edinburgh. 

Hope Prize in Chemistry. 

1&84. .. .Graduated Ph.D. (insigni cum laude) in the 
University of Heidelberg. 
Appointed Assistant to the Professor of 
Chemistry in the University of Edinburgh. 

1885.... Vans Dunlop Scholarship in Chemistry, 
Edinburgh University. 

1886. . . .Graduated D.Sc, University of Edinburgh 
Appointed Professor of Science in the Royal 
Military College of Canada. 



List of Papers in Scientific Journals. 



I. On the Atomic Weight of Tungsten : u Transactions 

of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 1886. and 
American Chemical Journal, VIII, 280 (1886). 

II. Notes on Electrolysis : 

The Electrician XXXIII, 177 (1894). 

III. Electrical Difference of Potential : 

The Electrical World XXIV, 589 (1894). 

IV. Experiments on the Vapour Pressures of Concen- 
trated Solutions of several Salts, especially Lithium 
and Galcium Nitrates : 

The Chemical News LXXII, 207 (1895). 

V. Electrical Discharge in the Atmosphere and in 

Vacuum Tubes : 
The Electrical World XXVII, 254 (1896). 

VI. The Permeability of Various Elements to the Roent- 
gen Rays : 

The Chemical News LXXIV, 298 (1896). 

VII. The Permeability of Elements of Low Atomic 
Weight to the Roentgen Rays : 

[To be read before the British Association Meet- 
ing in Toronto, (1896).] 



TESTIMONIALS. 



I. 

From Robert Wilhelm Bunsen, Prof essor of Chemistry 

in the University oj Heidelberg. 

Gerne bezeuge ich Herrn Dr. Waddell dass derselbe 
wsehrend zweier Semester von October, ! 883, bis 
August, 1884, sich auf das eifrigste mit wissenschaft- 
lichen Arbeiten in meinern Laboratorium beschgeftigt 
hat. 

Mit Vergnuegen habe ich waehrend dieser Zeit 
Veranlassung gehabt, die eben so ausdauernden als 
erfolgreichen wissenschaftlichen Bestrebungen dessel- 
ben anzuerkennen. 

Der Erfolg mit welchem derselbe seinen Studien 
obgelegen hat gewaehrt mir die Ueberzeugung dass 
derselbe eine seiner gruendlichen wissenschaftlichen 
Ausbildung entsprechende Stellung in anerkennens- 
werthen Weise ausfuellen wird. 



ft. W. BUNSEN. 



Heidelberg, 
den 23n April, 1896. 



II 

From Alex. Crum Brown, M.D., D.Sc , F.R.S.L. & E., 
Professor of Chemistry in the University of Edinburgh. 

I have much pleasure in bearing witness to the abil- 
ity and attainments of Dr John Waddell, whom I 
have known intimately since he came to Edinburgh. 
His diligence and the intelligent way in which he car- 
ried on his studies and practical work are sufficiently 
proved by his success in obtaining University distinc- 
tions, degrees and prizes, into the details of which I 
need not enter, as he has official evidence in reference 
to them, but as his chemical work in Edinburgh was 
carried on under my immediate observation, and as 
for a year he acted as one of my teaching assistants in 
the Laboratory, I am in a position to testify to mat- 
ters on which formal certificates are necessarily silent. 

In particular I can say that Dr. Waddell was a suc- 
cessful teacher and was personally liked by his stu- 
dents. He took pains to make himself thoroughly 
master of the details of the particular points in which 
he had to instruct others, while his extensive reading 
and his sound knowledge of chemistry and the allied 
sciences made his presence in the laboratory an advan- 
tage both to the students and to me. 

Much of Dr. Waddell's time has been taken up in 
work of the greatest value in preparing him to take a 
high place as a teacher of Chemistry rather than in 
work likely to attract the notice of the scientific 
world. In doing so I think he has acted wisely, and 
I confidently look forward to his future as the more 
valuable for the sound foundation he has laid. 

Dr. Waddell's position as Secretary of the University 
Chemical Society brought him into contact with scien- 
tific and practical men here, and familiarised him with 
business in a way which is, I think, of real value to 
one who may have to conduct the correspondence and 
attend to the affairs of a college, as well as teach his 
own special subject ALfix> CRUM BR()WN 

Sept. 15th, 1886. 



10 



IIT, 



From George Chrystal, M.A., Professor of Mathe- 
matics in the University of Edinburgh. 

I have much pleasure in speaking to that part of the 
scientific qualifications of Mr. John Waddell that hap- 
pened to come under my observation. I examined 
him in Mathematics for the 1st B Sc, and was struck 
with the quality of his work, so much so, that I men- 
tioned it at the time to some of my co-examiners and 
to Mr. Waddell himself. 

He has evidently kept up his interest in Mathe- 
matics, for he recently attended a special voluntary 
course of mine on Quaternions, and it was easy to see 
from conversation with him that he had a firm com- 
prehension of the subject. 

I have no hesitation in saying that Mr. Waddell's 
knowledge of Mathematics is quite sufficient to be of 
great use to him in his chemical work. 

G. CHRYSTAL. 



IV. 
From P. G. Tait, M.A., Sec. R. S. E., Hon. Fellow of 
St. Peter s College, Cambridge, Professor of Natural 
Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh. 

Dr. Waddell greatly distinguished himself during 
his student career in Edinburgh. 

He has selected Chemistry as his chief subject of 
study, but he is no mere specialist. I can testify to the 
accuracy and extent of his knowledge of General 
Physics, and to the skill with which he worked in 
the Physical Laboratory 

He is well acquainted with the modes of instruc- 
tion adopted in German, as well as in British 
Universities; and has had considerable experience in 
teaching. 

His original work is already of high promise and 
completes the necessary qualifications for a chair. 

P. G. TAIT. 

College, Edinburgh, August 11th, 1896. 



11 



V. 



From James Geikie, LL.D., F.R.S., &c, Murchison 
Professor of Geology and Mineralogy, University 
of Edinburgh. 

Dear Dr. Waddell, — I have very much pleasure in 
acceding to your request for a testimonial. 

When you studied Geology under me I was led to 
form a high opinion of your scientific accomplishments. 
Our many excursions in the field gave me ample oppor- 
tunities of testing your knowledge not only in Geology 
but in cognate subjects, and I was more than satisfied 
with the result. You have struck me as being not only 
an accurate observer, but a careful reasoner ; and you 
are endowed with that love and enthusiasm for science 
without which no good or great work is ever accom- 
plished. 

If a wide range of knowledge, accurate obser- 
vation, indefatigable zeal, and abounding energy are 
required for a scientific career, then I may safely pre- 
dict for you a highly honourable future. 

Earnestly wishing you all success, 

Believe me, yours very truly, 

JAMES GEIKIE. 

17th May, 1886. 



12 



VT. 



From John Gibson, Ph.D., F.R.S.E., F.I.C., Senior 
Demonstrator in the Chemical Laboratory of the 
University of Edinburgh. 

I have for several years back had special opportun- 
ities for watching Dr. Waddell's career as a student 
and latterly as a teacher of Chemical Science. From 
1880-1883, Dr Waddell was one of the best pupils in 
the laboratory, distinguishing himself especially by 
great energy and love of work. It was, therefore, 
with no surprise that I saw him gain the Hope prize, 
the highest distinction which the University awards 
to the student of Chemistry. 

After two seasons spent in Heidelberg, under Bun- 
sen, Dr. Waddell returned to Edinburgh where I was 
glad to welcome him as a colleague on his appoint- 
ment to the post of Junior Demonstrator. During the 
past year he has devoted himself with characteristic 
energy to his duties as a teacher and has won from his 
pupils by his constant attendance to their interests, at 
once their esteem and gratitude. 

Now that he is about to leave us, I gladly avail my- 
self of the opportunity to give expression to my con- 
fidence in his future career and to add my best wishes 
to those of the many friends he leaves behind him here. 

J. GIBSON. 

Sept. 20th, 1886. 



13 



VII. 



From Cargill G. Knott, D.Sc, Edin., P R.S.E., Pro- 
fessor of Physics, Imperial University , Japan, for- 
merly Assistant to the Chair of Natural Philosophy, 
Edinburgh University. 

I have much pleasure in testifying to the scientific 
abilities of Dr. John Waddell, Graduate of Science of 
the University of Edinburgh. As Assistant to the Pro- 
fessor of Natural Philosophy there, I had ample oppor- 
tunity of judging his powers as a student. In the 
general class he stood first on the Honour List ; and 
in the Physical Laboratory he proved himself to be a 
quick and accurate experimenter. 

In the Examination Hall he distinguished himself 
by his knowledge of Physics, which was noticeably 
superior to what is usually possessed by the graduate 
in Chemical Science. From personal intercourse, also, 
I have been able to form a high opinion of his scien- 
tific attainments; and these, I think, are such as to 
make him well qualified to fill a chair of Chemistry, 
to which, I understand, he aspires, and with which I 
trust he will soon be rewarded. 

CARGILL G. KNOTT. 

Tokyo, 
May 22nd, 1880. 



14 



VIII. 



From A. P. Aitken, M.A., D.Sc, F.R.S.E., Professor 
of Chemistry in the Royal Veterinary College ; Ex- 
aminer in Chemistry in the University of Edinburgh; 
Chemist in the Highland and Agricultural Society 
of Scotland. 

It gives me pleasure to testify that Dr. John Wad- 
dell is one of the most proficient and enthusiastic of 
the students who have studied Chemistry and worked 
in the Chemical Laboratory of the University of Edin- 
burgh during recent years. 

His having taken the Degree of D.Sc. is sufficient evi- 
dence that he possesses a sound knowledge of the sub- 
ject in which he graduated, but in obtaining that end 
he has taken honours by the way, and has shown since 
then that he is able to advance the progress of the 
science of Chemistry by means of original research, 
and that he is capable of guiding the progress of others 
who are engaged in Laboratory work and Chemical 
investigation. 

A. P. AITKEN. 

Chemical Laboratory, Clyde St., 
Edinburgh, 16th July, 1886. 



15 



IX. 



From Orme Masson, M.A., D. Sc, F.R.S.E , Late 
Elective Fellow in the University of Edinburgh ; 
Professor of Chemistry in the University of Mel- 
bourne. 

The thoroughness of Dr. John Waddell's training in 
Chemical and Physical Science is completely warranted 
by the fact that he has obtained the degree of D.Sc , 
in Edinburgh, and that of Ph.D., in Heidelberg; and, 
as he can add to these diplomas that of B A. (Dalhousie 
College), and B.Sc (London), there can be no doubt 
that he has had an academic experience more than 
usually rich and varied. A knowledge of different 
systems of teaching and examining is of great value to 
one who aspires to a University appointment ; and 
there are certainly few chemists among Dr. Waddell's 
contemporaries who can equal him in this respect. 

He has, moreover, already proved, during his tenure 
of assistantship in the University of Edinburgh, that 
he has the power of turning his thorough knowledge 
of Chemistry and his academic experience to good 
account and of imbuing his students with his own 
zealous spirit. 

He is an able and indefatigable worker in the labor- 
atory, and has all the qualities of a successful investi- 
gator. 

Having known him for many years and having 
long worked side by side with him, I can speak with 
confidence, of his ability, industry and conscientious- 
ness, and can warrant him a pleasant colleague. 

ORME MASSON 

Edinburgh, 
August 3rd, 1886. 



16 



X. 

From the Stude?its in the Chemical Laboratory of the 
University of Edinburgh. 

Dr. Waddell, 

We the undersigned, students in the Chemical La- 
boratory of the University of Edidburgh, having 
heard with regret that you have resigned your post as 
Assistant to the Professor of Chemistry, take this op- 
portunity of giving expression to our deep sense of 
yaur high qualities as a chemist, a teacher and a man 

In all our dealings with you we have found you to 
be courteous, painstaking and most zealous for our indi- 
vidual advancement in chemical knowledge 

In your public demonstrations as well as in your pri- 
vate instruction you have given evidence not only of 
thorough scientific attainments, but also of the pos- 
session in a marked degree of that power of exposition 
by means of which knowledge is communicated from 
one to another, and which forms the essential qualifi- 
cations of a successful teacher. While urging us for- 
ward in our studies you would permit of no half done 
or slipshod work, and your warm personal interest in 
our progress, formed an incentive to our diligence and 
rendered us eager to excel. 

Some of us have begun our Chemical studies under 
your guidance ; some of us were advanced to a certain 
extent in the science before coming in contact with you, 
but one and all of us unite in bearing testimony to the 
benefit which we have derived from your instruction, 
and in expressing the conviction that a lofty and use- 
tul career lies before you as a teacher of Chemistry. 

(Signed) 

G. K. B. ELPHINSTONE. A. S. WHITE. 

ANDREW KItfG. CHARLES T. SPRAGUE. 

CHARLES STEVENSON. JAMES G. ROSS. 

HUGH ROBERT MILL. F. MAITLAND GIBSON. 

T. R. MARSHALL. T. F. BAKBOUR. 

ALEX. SMITH. WILL'AM HOULD1NG. 

JAMES WALKER, P. C. RAY. 

JAMES H. R. PATERSON. 
March 26th, 1886. 



17 



XL 



From Gerald Kitson, Lt. -Colonel, Commandant of 
the Royal Military College of Canada. 

Dr. John Waddell has been Professor of Physics 
(including Electricity,) Chemistry, Geology and Miner- 
ology, for the Inst ten years; he is now leaving the 
Royal Military College, owing to the reduction of the 
staff, consequent on the re-organization of the College. 

Dr. Waddell is a very clever, experienced Professor, 
and is especially qualified, in my opinion, to teach 
students who are already well grounded in their sub- 
ject, and who are anxious for instruction in the higher 
branches of study. 

GEKALD KITSON. 

Royal Military College. 
Kingston, Ont , May 17th, 1897. 



XII. 

From Capt. J. B. Cochrane, Instructor of Scitnce in 
the Royal Military College of Canada. 

My Dear Waddell, -It was with sincere regret 
that I heard that the remodelling of the course of 
studies at the Royal Military College would deprive 
the staff, in you, of a member so eminently qualified 
to fill the position you have occupied of Professor of 
Science. 

During the ten years in which you have acted as 
Professor in the subjects included under this head, 
I can certify that your instruction has been most 
thorough, the different subjects kept well up to date 
and always made interesting. 

In addition to your instructional duties you have 
still found time for original work and contributions to 
Scientific Journals. 



18 

Your departure will be specially regretted by my- 
self, as, from our close intercourse for the past ten 
years, in the respective positions of Professor and 
Instructor of Science^ 1 have learned to appreciate you 
as a Scientist, a sure help in points of difficulty, and 
a valued friend. 

Believe me, my dear Waddell, 

Yours very sincerely, 

J. B COCHRANE. 

May 29th, 1897. 



XIII 



From Adam Shoutt, M. A., Professor of Political Science, 
Queens University, Kingston, Ont. 

I have known Dr. John Waddell quite intimately 
ior over ten years, and am able to testify with confi- 
dence to the many excellent features of his ability and 
character. 

The thorough course of preparation for his work 
through which he has passed, and the distinctions 
which he has won, are sufficient evidence of his gener- 
al ability and capacity to carry on advanced scientific 
work. 

His interest in his work and his amiability of char- 
acter tend to awaken the interest of his students and 
ensure a sympathetic treatment of their difficulties. 

In all matters he maintains a tolerant and unpreju- 
diced mental attitude. As a colleague he will be 
found most courteous and obliging. 

ADAM SHORTT. 

June 29th, 1897. 



19 



XIV. 

Frovn^f. L Goodwin, B. Sc., {London), D. Sc., (Edi?i.), 
F.R.S.C., Director of the School of Mining, Kings- 
ton, Ont. 

Dr. John Waddell has long been known to me as a 
careful student, a successful teacher and one gifted 
with the power of original research. 

Of his career as a student, I can speak in terms of 
the highest praise. His course in Edinburgh was 
brilliant; and he was there the winner of numerous 
prizes. My knowledge of him began in those years, 
and I have followed his career ever since, a period of 
some seventeen years During that time he has 
grown steadily in his knowledge of the subjects of 
Chemistry and Physics. His acquaintance with the 
higher mathematics gives him an advantage in the 
treatment of physics and of that part of chemistry 
which lies nearest to physics, an advantage which is 
at once apparent in many of his published papers. 

I consider Dr. Waddell unusually well qualified for 
a position in Physics or Chemical Physics. He has 
several times delivered courses of lectures to my hon- 
our students, so that I am in a position to judge with 
some accuracy of his qualifications in this regard. 

Of Dr. Waddell's personal character I can speak 
from an intimate friendship of seventeen years. I 
have perfect confidence in him as an upright, clean- 
hearted gentleman. 

W. L. GOODWIN. 

June 21st, 1897. 



A School Chemistry 



INTENDED FOR USE IN HIGH SCHOOLS AND 
IN ELEMENTARY CLASSES IN COLLEGES 

By JOHN WADDELL 

B.A. (Dal. Coll.), B.Sc. (Lond.), Ph.D. (Heidelberg), D.Sc. (Edin.) 

Member of the American Medical Society ; 

Formerly Assistant to the Professor of Chemistry in Edinburgh University ; 

Lecturer in Chemistry in the School of Mining, Kingston 

Half -Leather f 2mo xiii+278 pp* Price, 90 cents 

chapter CONTENTS 

I. Water. 
II. Hydrogen. 

III. Oxygen. , 

IV. Nitrogen. 

V. Carbon Dioxide and Monoxide. 

VI. Action of Hydrochloric Acid on Alkalis. 

VII. Laws of Chemical Combination and the Atomic Theory. 

VIII. Common Salt and Some Similar Compounds. 

IX. Hydrochloric Acid. 

X. The Halogens. 

XL Nitric Acid and the Oxides of Nitrogen. 

XII. Sulphur. 

XIII. The Phosphorus Group of Elements. 

XIV. Carbon. 
XV. Metals. 

XVI. The Alkali Metals. 
XVII. The Metals of the Alkaline Earths. 
XVIII. The Zinc Group of Metals. 
XIX. The Iron Group of Metals. 
XX. Metals of the Lead and of the Copper Group. 
Appendix. Index. 

published by 

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 

66 Fifth Avenue, New York 

BOSTON CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO ATLANTA 

Tremont BIdg. 2 15-22 1 Wabash Ave. 319-325 Sansome St. 1 40 Whitehall St. 



WAD DELL'S SCHOOL CHEMISTRY 

SCOPE OF THE WORK 

The aim of this book is to help the pupil in the dis- 
covery of new facts ; to enable him to see their connec- 
tion, and to show how facts lead to theory, and theory 
aids in investigation. 

Water is first discussed as being one of the most 
common substances. Then follows the consideration of 
hydrogen and oxygen, the latter leading up to the study 
of air and its constituents. Definitions are given as 
they are, needed and as they arise from consideration of 
the facts investigated. No mention of the atomic theory 
is made until the pupil has mastered most of the facts 
upon which Dalton founded his theory. He is thus en- 
abled to obtain an accurate view of the real meaning of 
formulae and to acquire an ability to use them correctly. 
The interrogatory method is largely used throughout 
the book; the questions, though simple, are intended to 
stimulate thought and to lead the pupil to observe the 
important phenomena, and to understand their full 
significance. . 

COMMENTS 
Thayer Academy, 

Braintree, Mass. 

" I am pleased with Waddell's book. It is up-to-date 
and written in the modern spirit. A good feature is the 
large amount of quantitative work. I am becoming more 
and more convinced that quantitative work gives character 
and value to the study of chemistry and physics, such 
as is to be obtained in no other way." 

— Dr. Charles A. Pitkin. 



A School Chemistry 



INTENDED FOR USE IN HIGH SCHOOLS AND 
IN ELEMENTARY CLASSES IN COLLEGES 

By JOHN WADDELL 

B.A. (Dal. Coll.), B.Sc. (Lond.), Ph.D. (Heidelberg), D.Sc. (Edin.) 

Member of the American Medical Society; 

Formerly Assistant to the Professor of Chemistry in Edinburgh University ; 

Lecturer in Chemistry in the School of Mining, Kingston 

Half-Leather J2mo xiii+278 pp. Price, 90 cents 

chapter CONTENTS 

I. Water. 
II. Hydrogen. 

III. Oxygen. 

IV. Nitrogen. 

V. Carbon Dioxide and Monoxide. 

VI. Action of Hydrochloric Acid on Alkalis. 

VII. Laws of Chemical Combination and the Atomic Theory. 

VIII. Common Salt and Some Similar Compounds. 

IX. Hydrochloric Acid. 

X. The Halogens. 

XI. Nitric Acid and the Oxides of Nitrogen. 

XII. Sulphur. 

• XIII. The Phosphorus Group of Elements. 

XIV. Carbon. 

XV. Metals. 

XVI. The Alkali Metals. 

XVII. The Metals of the Alkaline Earths. 

XVIII. The Zinc Group of Metals. 

XIX. The Iron Group of Metals. 

XX. Metals of the Lead and of the Copper Group. 
Appendix. Index. 

published by 

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 

66 Fifth Avenue, New York 

BOSTON CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO ATLANTA 

TremontBIdg. 215-22 J Wabash Ave. 319-325 Sansome St. 140 Whitehall St. 



WADDELL'S SCHOOL CHEMISTRY 
SCOPE OF THE WORK 

The aim of this book is to help the pupil in the dis- 
covery of new facts ; to enable him to see their connec- 
tion, and to show how facts lead to theory, and theory 
aids in investigation. 

Water is first discussed as being one of the most 
common substances. Then follows the consideration of 
hydrogen and oxygen, the latter leading up to the study 
of air and its constituents. Definitions are given as 
they are needed and as they arise from consideration of 
the facts investigated. No mention of the atomic theory 
is made until the pupil has mastered most of the facts 
upon which Dalton founded his theory. He is thus en- 
abled to obtain an accurate view of the real meaning of 
formulae and to acquire an ability to use them correctly. 
The interrogatory method is largely used throughout 
the book; the questions, though simple, are intended to 
stimulate thought and to lead the pupil to observe the 
important phenomena, and to understand their full 
significance. 

COMMENTS 
Thayer Academy, 

Braintree, Mass. 

"I am pleased with Waddell's book. It is up-to-date 
and written in the modern spirit. A good feature is the 
large amount of quantitative work. I am becoming more 
and more convinced that quantitative work gives character 
and value to the study of chemistry and physics, such 
as is- to be obtained in no other way." 

— Dr. Charles A. Pitkin. 



WADDELVS SCHOOL CHEMISTRY 

COMMENTS 

DeWitt Clinton High School, 

New York City. 

"I believe that the book is written on the right plan, 
and I shall hope to see it win the place which it deserves in 
secondary schools," — Frank Rollins. 



Clemson Agricultural College 

" I consider it a book of decided merit and one of 
the best of its kind." — Professor M. B. Hardin. 



State Normal School, 

Clarion, Pa. 

" I regard the treatment of the subject as very skillful. 

The idea of presenting the definitions after the mass of facts 
that lead up to them is an excellent feature. The many 
experiments and questions upon the same give practice in 
work very much needed in our schools." 

— Principal A. J. Davis. 



Provincial Normal School, Can. 

"A very suggestive book." — Professor John Brittain. 



State Normal School, 

Buffalo N Y. 

"It is an excellent text, containing the latest discov- 
eries in this science and very lucid in its treatment of the 
topics discussed. It is one of the very best I have seen for 
High School use/' — Irving P. Bishop. 



WADDELVS THE ARITHMETIC OF CHEMISTRT 
Cloth i2mo 133 pp. Price, 90 cents 



CONTENTS 

Chapter I. — Calculation Weights of Elements. Chapter II. 
— Simple Calculations of Weights. Chapter III. — More Complex 
Calculations of Weights. Chapter IV. — The Volume of Gases. 
Chapter V. — Calculations involving W T eight and Volume. Chap- 
ter VI. — Calculations in Volumetric Analysis. Chapter VII. — 
Calculation of Formulae. 

Appendices. 

A. The French System of Measures. 

B. Arithmetical Calculations. 

C. Comparison of Thermometric Scales. 

D. Table of Calculation or Atomic Weights. 

E. Equations in Frequent Use. 

F. Pressure of Aqueous Vapor. 

G. Table of Logarithms. 

This book is intended to assist students in overcoming the 
difficulties they encounter in making chemical calculations. An 
Appendix contains tables which may have to be consulted in 
making the calculations. In each chapter the principle is clearly 
explained by a number of examples, and a variety of problems 
is given. 

COMMENTS 
Sheffield Scientific School, of 

Yale University. 
"The book suits my classes exactly." — Professor H. L.Wells. 

School of Mining, Kingston, Can. 

"Just the thing I want."— Professor W. L. Goodwin. 

Journal of the American Chemical Society 

"This is the best elementary text-book on chemical arith- 
metic, or stoichiometry, we have examined." 

PUBLISHED BY 

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 

66 Fifth Avenue, New York 

BOSTON CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO ATLANTA 

Tremont BIdg. 2 J 5-22 J Wabash Ave. 3 1 9-325 Sansome St. 140 Whitehall St. 



WAD DELLS SCHOOL CHEMISTRY 

COMMENTS 

DeWitt Clinton High School, 

New York City. 

"I believe that the book is written on the right plan. 
and I shall hope to see it win the place which it deserves in 
secondary schools." — Frank Rollins. 



Clemson Agricultural College 

<l I consider it a book of decided merit and one of 
the best of its kind." — Professor M. B. Hardin, 



State Normal School, 

Clarion, Pa. 
" I regard the treatment of the subject as very skillful. 
The idea of presenting the definitions after the mass of facts 
that lead up to them is an excellent feature. The many 
experiments and questions upon the same give practice in 
work very much needed in our schools." 

— Principal A. J. Davis. 



Provincial Normal School, Can. 

"A very suggestive book." — Professor John Brittain. 



State Normal School, 

Buffalo N. Y. 

"It is an excellent text, containing the latest discov- 
eries in this science and very lucid in its treatment of the 
topics discussed. It is one of the very best I have seen for 
High School use/' — Irving P. Bishop. 



WADDELUS THE ARITHMETIC OF CHEMISTRT 
Cloth i2mo 133 pp. Price, 90 cents 



CONTENTS 

Chapter I. — Calculation Weights of Elements. Chapter II. 
— Simple Calculations of Weights. Chapter III. — More Complex 
Calculations of Weights. Chapter IV. — The Volume of Gases. 
Chapter V. — Calculations involving Weight and Volume. Chap- 
ter VI. — Calculations in Volumetric Analysis. Chapter VII. — 
Calculation of Formulae. 

Appendices. 

A. The French System of Measures, 

B. Arithmetical Calculations. 

C. Comparison of Thermometric Scales. 

D. Table of Calculation or Atomic Weights. 

E. Equations in Frequent Use. 

F. Pressure of Aqueous Vapor. 

G. Table of Logarithms. 

This book is intended to assist students in overcoming the 
difficulties they encounter in making chemical calculations. An 
Appendix contains tables which may have to be consulted in 
making the calculations. In each chapter the principle is clearly 
explained by a number of examples, and a variety of problems 
is given. 

COMMENTS 
Sheffield Scientific School, of 

] 'ale I ~]iiversity. 
"The book suits my classes exactly." — Professor H. L.Wells. 

School of Mining, Kingston, Can. 

"Just the thing I want." — Professor W. L. Goodwin. 

Journal of the American Chemical Society 

"This is the best elementary text-book on chemical arith- 
metic, or stoichiometry, we have examined." 

PUBLISHED BY 

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 

66 Fifth Avenue, New York 

BOSTON CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO ATLANTA 

Tremont Bidg. 2 J 5-22 1 Wabash Ave. 3 1 9-325 Sansome St. 140 Whitehall St.